22
Jul
2014

To read a novel is to wonder constantly, even at moments when we lose ourselves most deeply in the book: How much of this is fantasy, and how much is real?

 - What Our Minds Do When We Read Novels by Orhan Pamuk (via treesofreverie)
Posted 22 minutes ago3,344 notesVIA / SOURCEFiled Under: #quote #books #Reading #Reader's Quirks #Feeding the Queue
22
Jul
2014

WHEN THE FIRST BOOK IN A SERIES IS REALLY GOOD

dukeofbookingham:

I’m just like:

image

Posted 59 minutes ago5,837 notesVIA / SOURCEFiled Under: #book series #Reader's Quirks #Feeding the Queue
22
Jul
2014

rabidauthor:

trashy-prince:

2srooky:

shanellbklyn:

x-cunt-hunter-x:

kxngvxgitx:

cold-fury:

One of the best moments of my childhood.

BITCH

ZERO HAD ZERO FUCKS

I can’t even tell you how excited I was that they turned this book into a movie and it was good

I literally have absolutely no complaints with the movie at all. Once, my friend and I did comparisons from the book and the movie, and we found the only major difference was the fact that Stanley wasn’t heavy set when he arrived at the camp in the movie. The majority of the script is raw quotations from the book.
This is my favorite book to movie adaptation and it did everything Percy Jackson, Inkheart, and The Golden Compass didn’t.

yesss this was such a good book and film

And the only reason Stanely wasn’t heavy set was because in the book he loses tons of weight and eventually ends up being almost thin. The director said he didn’t want to force an adolescent boy to lose weight on such a quick filming schedule, and L’bouf’s audition was so spot on, that they decided to go with a thinner Stanely from the beginning

Posted 1 hour ago397,807 notesVIA / SOURCEFiled Under: #Holes #stanley yelnats #Zero #Page to Screen
22
Jul
2014
teachingliteracy:

Books (by Hekabe)

teachingliteracy:

Books (by Hekabe)

Posted 2 hours ago459 notesVIA / SOURCEFiled Under: #books #Feeding the Queue
22
Jul
2014
k-lionheart:

xcgirl08:

fairytalemood:

"The Lindworm" by Naomi Butterfield

AMAZING OBSCURE FAIRY TALE, MUCH? OKAY OKAY OKAY, HERE:
A King and Queen ruled in a time of peace and abundance; the only mar upon their happiness was that they had no children, through their youth and even into their middle age, despite many fervent hopes and prayers. One day the Queen went walking on a forest path without her attendants. There, in the dark quiet of her despair, an old woman found her. 
"My dear," asked the woman, "why are you so sad?"
"It doesn’t matter," answered the Queen, gently. "It wouldn’t make a difference if you knew."
"You may be surprised." 
"The King and I have no children. He lacks an heir, and I have always wanted a child of my own to care for. But you see, that’s not something you can help."
"Of course it is," nodded the woman, for naturally she was a witch. "Listen and do as I say; take a drinking cup and place it upside-down in your garden tonight. In the morning, you will find two roses beneath it - one red, one white. If you eat the red rose you shall give birth to a son, and the white rose shall give you a girl. But remember that you must not eat both."
"Not both?"
"No," the woman said. 
Astonished, and not a little suspicious, the Queen agreed. That night she did as the old woman had instructed, and in the morning she discovered two small roses under the cup’s brim. 
"But which one should I choose?" thought the Queen. "If I have a son, he may grow into a man who marches off to war and dies. If I have a daughter, she may stay longer with me, but I will have to see her given away in marriage. In the end, I may have no child after all."
At last she decided on the white rose, but it was so sweet to the taste - and the thought of losing a daughter to marriage was so bitter - that she ate the red rose as well, hardly remembering the old woman’s warning.
Shortly afterwards, as happens in such stories, the Queen was found to be with child. Her husband was traveling when the time came for her to give birth, and so he did not bear witness to what happened, which was this:
The Queen’s first child was no child at all, but instead there tumbled forth from her body the long, scaly one of a lindworm, a hideous dragon with a venomous bite. It scrabbled out the window on its two legs, even before the terrified midwives could move to do anything, and amidst the chaos the Queen delivered a second child as well. This one was a fine, handsome boy, healthy and perfectly formed, and the Queen made her midwives swear that they would tell no one what they had seen. And when the King arrived home, joyous at the news of his son’s birth, not a word was said. 
Years passed, so that the Queen wondered if it had not been a terrible dream. Soon enough it came time for the prince to find a wife, and he set out with his guard to a neighboring kingdom to ask for its princess’s hand in marriage. But suddenly a great lindworm appeared, and laid itself before the prince’s horse, and from its jagged-tooth mouth came a voice:
"A bride for me before a bride for you!"
The prince and his company turned about to flee. The Lindworm blocked their passage and spoke again.
"A bride for me before a bride for you!"
The prince journeyed home to tell his parents. Distraught, the Queen confessed that it was true. The Lindworm was indeed the elder brother of the prince, and so by rights should marry first. The King wrote to the ruler of a distant land, asking that they send their princess to marry his son: but he did not say which one.
A lovely princess journeyed to the kingdom, and did not see her bridegroom until he appeared beside her in the Great Hall, and by then (naturally) it was too late. The next morning they found the Lindworm asleep alone in the bridal bedchamber, and it was quite clear he had devoured his new wife. 
A second princess was sent, and a third. Both met the same fate, but each time the prince dared to embark on a journey, the Lindworm would appear again and speak: 
"A bride for me before a bride for you!"
"Father," the prince said, " we must find a wife for my elder brother."
"And where am I to find her?" asked the King. "We have already made enemies of the men who sent their daughters to us. Stories are spreading fast, and I am sure no princess would dare to come now."
So instead the King went to the royal gardener’s cottage, where he knew the old man lived with his only daughter. 
"Will you give me your daughter to marry my son, the Lindworm?" asked the King.
"No!" cried the gardener. "Please, she is everything I have in this world. Your monstrous son has eaten his way through three princesses, and he’ll gobble her up just the same. She’s too good for such a fate.”
"You must," the King said, "You must."
Distraught, the gardener told his daughter everything. She agreed to the King’s request and went into the forest so that her father would not see her weeping.
And there, in the dark quiet of her despair, an old woman found her. 
"My dear," asked the woman, "why are you so sad?"
"I’m sorry," answered the girl, kindly. "It wouldn’t make a difference if I told you."
"You may be surprised." 
"How can that be? I’m to be married to the King’s son, the Lindworm. He’s eaten his first three brides, and I don’t know what will stop me from meeting the same end. That’s not something  you can help me with."
"Of course it is," nodded the woman again. "Listen and do as I say. Before the marriage ceremony, dress yourself in ten snow-white shifts beneath your gown. Ask that a tub of lye, a tub of milk, and as many birch rods as a man can carry be brought to your bridal chamber. After you are wed, and your husband orders you to disrobe, bid him to shed a skin first. He will ask you this nine times, and when you are left wearing one shift you must whip him with the rods, wash him in the lye, bath him in the milk, wrap him in the discarded shifts, and hold him in your arms."
"Do I truly have to hold him?" the girl asked, in disgust.
"You must. It may mean your life."
The girl was suspicious, but she agreed to the woman’s plan however absurd it seemed. When the day came for the marriage, she dressed herself in ten white shifts before donning the heavy gown they offered her. When she looked upon her husband for the first time, waiting for her in the Great Hall, her steps did not falter. And when she asked for the rods, the lye, and the milk, she said it with such ease that the servant could do nothing but obey.
Finally, the girl and the Lindworm were left alone in the darkened bedchamber. For a moment she listened to the rasp and click of his scales on stone, and heard his soughing breath. 
"Maiden," said the Lindworm, "shed your shift for me."
"Prince Lindworm," answered the girl, "shed your skin first!"
"No one has ever asked me that before," the answer came.
"I am asking it of you now." 
So the Lindworm shed a skin, and the girl shed a shift, but she revealed the second shift underneath. 
"Maiden," said the Lindworm, a second time, "shed your shift for me."
"Prince Lindworm," answered the girl, again, "shed your skin first!"
They repeated this, nine times in all, and each time the Lindworm shed a skin the girl removed another white shift, until she was left wearing one. 
The Lindworm, shivering and weak and bloodied, spoke his request a last time.
"Wife," asked the Lindworm, "will you shed your shift for me?"
"Husband,"answered the girl, "will you shed your skin first?"
And the Lindworm did as she asked of him, tearing himself free of scales and armor even to the bare flesh beneath, and the girl whipped the writhing creature with her birch rods until they snapped; she carried the whole massive length of him to the tubs, lye and milk, washed him clean and bathed him and swathed him in the shifts like a great, terrible child, collapsed to the floor with her husband in her arms, and there she stayed until, exhausted, she fell asleep.
When she woke, it was to the timid knocking of a servant on the door. 
"Princess?" asked the servant. "Princess? Are you alive?"
The girl looked about the bedchamber: there in the morning light were the dried skins, and the tubs, and the broken rods, and the blood, and in her arms slept a pale, weary, but very handsome man. 
"Yes," she answered. "Yes, I am."
The King and Queen were astounded and thrilled to hear how the girl had saved their son from his curse, and she ruled together with her husband for many long years, and thus closes our tale of the most intense game of strip poker that you shall ever hear.

This whole tale is amazing. I lost it at the last part oh man.

k-lionheart:

xcgirl08:

fairytalemood:

"The Lindworm" by Naomi Butterfield

AMAZING OBSCURE FAIRY TALE, MUCH? OKAY OKAY OKAY, HERE:

A King and Queen ruled in a time of peace and abundance; the only mar upon their happiness was that they had no children, through their youth and even into their middle age, despite many fervent hopes and prayers. One day the Queen went walking on a forest path without her attendants. There, in the dark quiet of her despair, an old woman found her. 

"My dear," asked the woman, "why are you so sad?"

"It doesn’t matter," answered the Queen, gently. "It wouldn’t make a difference if you knew."

"You may be surprised." 

"The King and I have no children. He lacks an heir, and I have always wanted a child of my own to care for. But you see, that’s not something you can help."

"Of course it is," nodded the woman, for naturally she was a witch. "Listen and do as I say; take a drinking cup and place it upside-down in your garden tonight. In the morning, you will find two roses beneath it - one red, one white. If you eat the red rose you shall give birth to a son, and the white rose shall give you a girl. But remember that you must not eat both."

"Not both?"

"No," the woman said. 

Astonished, and not a little suspicious, the Queen agreed. That night she did as the old woman had instructed, and in the morning she discovered two small roses under the cup’s brim. 

"But which one should I choose?" thought the Queen. "If I have a son, he may grow into a man who marches off to war and dies. If I have a daughter, she may stay longer with me, but I will have to see her given away in marriage. In the end, I may have no child after all."

At last she decided on the white rose, but it was so sweet to the taste - and the thought of losing a daughter to marriage was so bitter - that she ate the red rose as well, hardly remembering the old woman’s warning.

Shortly afterwards, as happens in such stories, the Queen was found to be with child. Her husband was traveling when the time came for her to give birth, and so he did not bear witness to what happened, which was this:

The Queen’s first child was no child at all, but instead there tumbled forth from her body the long, scaly one of a lindworm, a hideous dragon with a venomous bite. It scrabbled out the window on its two legs, even before the terrified midwives could move to do anything, and amidst the chaos the Queen delivered a second child as well. This one was a fine, handsome boy, healthy and perfectly formed, and the Queen made her midwives swear that they would tell no one what they had seen. And when the King arrived home, joyous at the news of his son’s birth, not a word was said. 

Years passed, so that the Queen wondered if it had not been a terrible dream. Soon enough it came time for the prince to find a wife, and he set out with his guard to a neighboring kingdom to ask for its princess’s hand in marriage. But suddenly a great lindworm appeared, and laid itself before the prince’s horse, and from its jagged-tooth mouth came a voice:

"A bride for me before a bride for you!"

The prince and his company turned about to flee. The Lindworm blocked their passage and spoke again.

"A bride for me before a bride for you!"

The prince journeyed home to tell his parents. Distraught, the Queen confessed that it was true. The Lindworm was indeed the elder brother of the prince, and so by rights should marry first. The King wrote to the ruler of a distant land, asking that they send their princess to marry his son: but he did not say which one.

A lovely princess journeyed to the kingdom, and did not see her bridegroom until he appeared beside her in the Great Hall, and by then (naturally) it was too late. The next morning they found the Lindworm asleep alone in the bridal bedchamber, and it was quite clear he had devoured his new wife. 

A second princess was sent, and a third. Both met the same fate, but each time the prince dared to embark on a journey, the Lindworm would appear again and speak: 

"A bride for me before a bride for you!"

"Father," the prince said, " we must find a wife for my elder brother."

"And where am I to find her?" asked the King. "We have already made enemies of the men who sent their daughters to us. Stories are spreading fast, and I am sure no princess would dare to come now."

So instead the King went to the royal gardener’s cottage, where he knew the old man lived with his only daughter. 

"Will you give me your daughter to marry my son, the Lindworm?" asked the King.

"No!" cried the gardener. "Please, she is everything I have in this world. Your monstrous son has eaten his way through three princesses, and he’ll gobble her up just the same. She’s too good for such a fate.”

"You must," the King said, "You must."

Distraught, the gardener told his daughter everything. She agreed to the King’s request and went into the forest so that her father would not see her weeping.

And there, in the dark quiet of her despair, an old woman found her. 

"My dear," asked the woman, "why are you so sad?"

"I’m sorry," answered the girl, kindly. "It wouldn’t make a difference if I told you."

"You may be surprised." 

"How can that be? I’m to be married to the King’s son, the Lindworm. He’s eaten his first three brides, and I don’t know what will stop me from meeting the same end. That’s not something  you can help me with."

"Of course it is," nodded the woman again. "Listen and do as I say. Before the marriage ceremony, dress yourself in ten snow-white shifts beneath your gown. Ask that a tub of lye, a tub of milk, and as many birch rods as a man can carry be brought to your bridal chamber. After you are wed, and your husband orders you to disrobe, bid him to shed a skin first. He will ask you this nine times, and when you are left wearing one shift you must whip him with the rods, wash him in the lye, bath him in the milk, wrap him in the discarded shifts, and hold him in your arms."

"Do I truly have to hold him?" the girl asked, in disgust.

"You must. It may mean your life."

The girl was suspicious, but she agreed to the woman’s plan however absurd it seemed. When the day came for the marriage, she dressed herself in ten white shifts before donning the heavy gown they offered her. When she looked upon her husband for the first time, waiting for her in the Great Hall, her steps did not falter. And when she asked for the rods, the lye, and the milk, she said it with such ease that the servant could do nothing but obey.

Finally, the girl and the Lindworm were left alone in the darkened bedchamber. For a moment she listened to the rasp and click of his scales on stone, and heard his soughing breath. 

"Maiden," said the Lindworm, "shed your shift for me."

"Prince Lindworm," answered the girl, "shed your skin first!"

"No one has ever asked me that before," the answer came.

"I am asking it of you now." 

So the Lindworm shed a skin, and the girl shed a shift, but she revealed the second shift underneath. 

"Maiden," said the Lindworm, a second time, "shed your shift for me."

"Prince Lindworm," answered the girl, again, "shed your skin first!"

They repeated this, nine times in all, and each time the Lindworm shed a skin the girl removed another white shift, until she was left wearing one.

The Lindworm, shivering and weak and bloodied, spoke his request a last time.

"Wife," asked the Lindworm, "will you shed your shift for me?"

"Husband,"answered the girl, "will you shed your skin first?"

And the Lindworm did as she asked of him, tearing himself free of scales and armor even to the bare flesh beneath, and the girl whipped the writhing creature with her birch rods until they snapped; she carried the whole massive length of him to the tubs, lye and milk, washed him clean and bathed him and swathed him in the shifts like a great, terrible child, collapsed to the floor with her husband in her arms, and there she stayed until, exhausted, she fell asleep.

When she woke, it was to the timid knocking of a servant on the door. 

"Princess?" asked the servant. "Princess? Are you alive?"

The girl looked about the bedchamber: there in the morning light were the dried skins, and the tubs, and the broken rods, and the blood, and in her arms slept a pale, weary, but very handsome man. 

"Yes," she answered. "Yes, I am."

The King and Queen were astounded and thrilled to hear how the girl had saved their son from his curse, and she ruled together with her husband for many long years, and thus closes our tale of the most intense game of strip poker that you shall ever hear.

This whole tale is amazing. I lost it at the last part oh man.

Posted 2 hours ago94,977 notesVIA / SOURCEFiled Under: #The Lindworm #Fairy Tales #Passed Down by the Tellers of Tales #Feeding the Queue
22
Jul
2014
deadly-velvet ASKED: Hi (: I love your blog! It's one of my favorites c: I figured other people must love it too and I was wondering if you could tell your followers about my blog write-for-the-stars? It's a blog based around helping writers become better. (Plus posting lots of things related to reading/writing/books/quotes/and such.) There's writing tips, word/challenge of the day, and when I get enough followers I'd really love to start doing writing challenges. But I barely have any followers at the moment :/

Go check out this blog!

write-for-the-stars

I adore writing blogs just as much as book ones and though young yet this is quite a good one.

Posted 3 hours agoFiled Under: #it's fine that I just published the ask right #deadly-velvet #Rose Answers Things
22
Jul
2014
windblownpages:

Summer (re)reads. 

windblownpages:

Summer (re)reads. 

Posted 3 hours ago621 notesVIA / SOURCEFiled Under: #books
22
Jul
2014

A spring afternoon I discovered a bowl on my desk, just a few inches of clear water in it. Floating on the surface was a flower petal…as I watched, it sank…just before it reached the bottom, it was transformed, into a fish. It was beautiful magic, wondrous to behold. The flower petal had come from a lily, your mother.(Lily Evans b. 30th January 1960)

Posted 4 hours ago794 notesVIA / SOURCEFiled Under: #Lily Evans #I aore this fancast #The age is right and more than that I can imagine her playing both the Lily at home on the wrong side of the tracks and as a girl doing her #best to fit into higher society at Hogwarts #This is the Lily I saw as I read #I Solemnly Swear I'm Up To No Good #Feeding the Queue
22
Jul
2014
Posted 4 hours ago888 notesVIA / SOURCEFiled Under: #Reading #Feeding the Queue
22
Jul
2014

Let us read, and let us dance; these two amusements will never do any harm to the world.

 - Voltaire (via observando)
Posted 5 hours ago762 notesVIAFiled Under: #quote #Reading #Voltaire #Feeding the Queue
22
Jul
2014

The Words by Mikko Eerola

The Words by Mikko Eerola

Posted 5 hours ago242 notesVIAFiled Under: #Reading #illistration #Feeding the Queue
21
Jul
2014

tyrien:

In Ancient Greek mythology, Lamia (Greek:  Λάμια) was  a mistress of the god  Zeus, causing Zeus’ jealous wife,  Hera, to kill all of Lamia’s children  and transform her into a monster that hunts and devours the children of others.  Some accounts say she has a serpent’s tail below the waist.  In later stories, Lamia was cursed with the inability to close her eyes so that she would always obsess over the image of her dead children. [x]

Posted 15 hours ago2,046 notesVIA / SOURCEFiled Under: #Lamia #Mythology #Greek Mythology #Passed Down by the Tellers of Tales
21
Jul
2014

How do you explain to a nonreader that books aren’t just things but treasured friends? Companions?

 - Laura Jensen Walker, Daring Chloe (via simplybookdrunk)
Posted 15 hours ago1,147 notesVIA / SOURCEFiled Under: #quote #books #Reader's Quirks #Feeding the Queue
21
Jul
2014

nobodysuspectsthebutterfly:

oh. my god.

So I saw a post on donewithwoodenteeth's blog where she was discussing Sansa's name and the fact that nobody really knows where GRRM got it from. It's been thought it might derive from Sancha, Sancia (though note there is definitely no connection to Sancia of Aragon), or others, but the actual name itself doesn’t seem to have existed before AGOT was published in 1996. And I mentioned I always thought Sansa might derive from Susanna, but it’s possible that GRRM found the name in a really obscure baby name book or history, and noted that I once found “Clegane” in an Irish geneaology book.

And then I thought, hey, I found the possible source of “Clegane” through researching on Google Books — what might I turn up if I searched for “Sansa”? Had to subtract anything that might give me results for ASOIAF or GoT or that Sandisk MP3 player, and then had to subtract South Africa and kalimba, and so on… no, you don’t care about the search process, do you, you want to know what I found. Well, it’s big.

From Robert W. Chambers's 1920 novel The Slayer of Souls:

"I—I was talking with Sa-n’sa," she faltered.
"With whom?"
"With Sa-n’sa… We called her Sansa."
"Who the dickens is Sansa?"
"We were three comrades at the Temple," she said timidly, "—Yulun, Sansa, and myself. We loved each other. We always went to the Lake of the Ghosts together—for protection—"
"Go on!"
"Sansa was a girl of the Aroulads, born at Buldak —as was Temujin. The night she was born three moon-rainbows made circles around her Yailak. The Baroulass horsemen saw this and prayed loudly in their saddles. Then they galloped to Yian and came crawling on their bellies to Sanang Noiane with the news of the miracle. And Sanang came with a thousand riders in leather armour. And, ‘What is this child’s name?’ he shouted, riding into the Yailak with his black banners flapping around him like devil’s wings." 
"A poor Manggoud came out of the tent of skins, carrying the new born infant and touched his head to Sanang’s stirrup. ‘This babe is called Tchagane,’ he said, trembling all over. ‘No!’ cries Sanang, ‘she is called Sansa. Give her to me and may Erlik seize you!’
And he took the baby on his saddle in front of him and struck his spurs deep; and so came Sansa to Yian under a roaring rustle of black silk banners…. It is so written in the Book of Iron… Allahou Ekber.”

Yeah, that is a little incoherent, sorry. It goes on, apparently Sansa is a fairly important supporting character in this book, a story about an escaped priestess and a conspiracy of elder gods worshippers / socialists / anarchists… uh, anyway. Follow that link above if you want to read more. (I tried and failed, but I did at least get the impression that the Sansa in this book is more like Missandei or Quaithe or Dany than Sansa Stark.)

But you know why this is so interesting? Because not only is this the earliest reference I can find of the name Sansa in fiction, I’m pretty damn sure GRRM has read this book. See, Robert W. Chambers was the author of The King In Yellow (recently famous because of True Detective, I believe), and a major influence on H.P. Lovecraft and his circle. And GRRM is a huge fan of Lovecraft (source 1, 2, and note Dagon Greyjoy and the Drowned God are some of the very deliberate references to HPL in ASOIAF), and even references The King in Yellow through the city of Carcosa, east of Asshai.

So, there we go then, the resolution of the mystery. Afraid this still won’t help with those name meanings graphics, though.

Posted 16 hours ago210 notesVIA / SOURCEFiled Under: #Sansa Stark #names #George R.R. Martin #A Song of Ice and Fire
21
Jul
2014
Posted 16 hours ago77 notesVIA / SOURCEFiled Under: #The Luggage #The Discworld #Terry Pratchett #Feeding the Queue